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New cooling method to revolutionise exports of fish from the Nordics?

The photo shows a comparison between a salmon 4 days after harvest (left) and a sub-chilled salmon 4 days after harvest (right). Photo: Matis
  • Publisert 01.10.2015
How can we catch fish in the North Sea and serve it with the same quality on the other side of world just hours later? At the same the time, is it possible to carry the fish more efficient and lower the environmental impact? A newly established Nordic project might have the answers.

 

The world is getting smaller by the minute. Foods, goods and various products are shipped across the globe every day and the demands for efficiency, quality and low-cost gets bigger. In the Nordics, one of our main export products are fish, both salmon and whitefish. Especially in East Asia, Nordic fish is very popular. The distance from the Nordics to East Asia is great and therefore the transportation requires good and functional methods to keep the fish fresh and the quality high. Often, the main issue is problems with fluctuation and uncontrolled temperature. Using a method developed by Nordic researches, called sub-chilling, the project Superchillin is looking to address these issues and eventually commercialize the method.
Lowers cost and CO2 emissions.
The sub-chilling method means that the cooling of the fish is moved into the flesh instead of relying on ice to maintain cold during the production and logistics. Because there is no need for ice, the method will lower the cost drastically and save extra weight for producers and customers. This will also lower the environmental impact of trucking and flying with less CO2 emissions.
The method was developed in Norway a few years ago and is now put into bigger scale. The method have been testes on several shipments to East Asia and the results so far is good.
-We strongly believe this project will make great impact within in marine industry. The quality of the sub-chilled fish is unbelievable, says Gunnar Thordarson. Thordarson is the project leader working for Matis, the Icelandic Food and Biotech R&D institute.
- We are now focusing on resource and testing, but the plan is to commercialize the method next fall, Thordarson explains.
Two phased plan
The first phase of the project will deal with definition and the border between sub-chilling and freezing, with plans to sell this new ideology to the seafood business in the Nordic countries.
The next phase will be to explore the pros and cons of the sub-chilling method for quality and economic value purposes, to create better products for seafood consumers. 
- One of the issues with the sub-chilled fish, especially the whitefish is that it comes with different stiffness, depending on how long ago it was caught. We are therefore working on a side project, which will modify filleting and adapt it to the sub-chilled fish, Thordarson explains
Superchillin for fish is one of 8 projects founded by Nordic Innovations Nordic Marine Program 2.0. The Program was initiated this year to promote cross-sectorial innovations within the Nordic marine industry. 
The project is owned by Grieg Seafood and is a cooperated between Matis, Norway Seafood, Hattala OY, Iceprotein, FISK Seafood, Skaginn h/f and 3X Technology.

The world is getting smaller by the minute. Foods, goods and various products are shipped across the globe every day and the demands for efficiency, quality and low-cost gets bigger. In the Nordics, one of our main export products are fish, both salmon and whitefish. Especially in East Asia, Nordic fish is very popular. The distance from the Nordics to East Asia is great and therefore the transportation requires good and functional methods to keep the fish fresh and the quality high. Often, the main issue is problems with fluctuation and uncontrolled temperature. Using a method developed by Nordic researches, called sub-chilling, the project Superchillin for fish is looking to address these issues and eventually commercialise the method.

 

 

Lowers cost and CO2 emissions

 
The sub-chilling method means that the cooling of the fish is moved into the flesh instead of relying on ice to maintain cold during the production and logistics. Because there is no need for ice, the method will lower the cost drastically and save extra weight for producers and customers. This will also lower the environmental impact of trucking and flying with less CO2 emissions.

 

The method was developed in Norway a few years ago and is now put into bigger scale. The method have been tested on several shipments to East Asia and the results so far is good.

 

– We strongly believe this project will make great impact within in marine industry. The quality of the sub-chilled fish is unbelievable, says Gunnar Thordarson. Thordarson is the project leader working for Matis, the Icelandic Food and Biotech R&D institute.

 

– We are now focusing on resource and testing, but the plan is to commercialise the method next fall, Thordarson explains.

 

 

Two-phased plan

 
The first phase of the project will deal with definition and the border between sub-chilling and freezing, with plans to sell this new ideology to the seafood business in the Nordic countries.

 

The next phase will be to explore the pros and cons of the sub-chilling method for quality and economic value purposes, to create better products for seafood consumers. 

 

– One of the issues with the sub-chilled fish, especially the whitefish, is that it comes with different stiffness, depending on how long ago it was caught. We are therefore working on a side project, which will modify filleting and adapt it to the sub-chilled fish, Thordarson explains.

 

Superchillin for fish is one of 8 projects founded by Nordic Innovation's Nordic Marine Program 2.0. The Program was initiated this year to promote cross-sectorial innovations within the Nordic marine industry. 

 

The project is owned by Grieg Seafood and is a cooperated between Matis, Norway Seafood, Hattala OY, Iceprotein, FISK Seafood, Skaginn h/f and 3X Technology.